Parents and Teachers

These pages are provided for your child's use and enjoyment by (Bank Name). Schools are encouraged to use these pages through (Bank Web Site) as a tool to assist teachers teaching about banking and money.

The only information collected is the number of visitors. No other information is collected. No personal information is required or collected to use these pages. Privacy Policy

This site is paid for by (Bank Name) and copyrighted by DGM Graphics, Inc. No unauthorized copies or use are allowed.

The site is divided into three suites: Preschool, Elementary and Teens.

Preschool teaches money fundamentals and uses elements that can be related to the banking process. Each section increases in difficulty and uses a repetition factor, to enhance the learning process. In the Preschool suite, most of the navigation is symbolic rather than text (see Navigation Buttons). Only one crossword exists here and that is spelling numbers from one to ten.

The Elementary Suite builds upon skills acquired in school, that are required to complete banking functions for a Savings Account. Here the child will learn how to deposit funds and withdraw funds from a Savings Account, using progressively more difficult screens. The puzzles will enhance spelling and math skills.

The Teen Suite prepares the teen for a checking account. It covers deposits, checks and bank statement reconciliations. In addition, an ATM has been provided to teach the proper process of ATM usage, including ATM Deposits. (It should be noted here deposits can only take place at Home Bank ATMs and not all ATMs.)

Navigation Buttons


Last Page Button


Next Page Button


Page Refresh Button


Help Button


Calculator

Everybody has an opinion reguarding allowances . What is appropriate? What should the ground rules be? Where do parents find resources to answer these questions. At Allowance Magic.

Allowance Magic, site explores the allowance questions and helps you determine what is the right allowance for your child.

The mouse changes to a crayon when over the coloring page. The child must select a color from the color palette. Then the child can move the crayon to the object they desire to color and click.

This is a money relationship exercise. Sound should be turned on, since the reward for the correct selection is a bell. Example five pennies equals a nickel. Clicking on a dime will sound a negative ting, clicking on the nickel will produce a bell. For computers without sound, a smiling or frowning face will also respond to the child's choice.

The jigsaw puzzles are drag and drop.They are set up to be progressively more difficult. Starting with simple nine piece puzzles and going up to twenty five piece puzzles. The small picture at the lower right corner is what the completed puzzle should look like. When the puzzle piece is close to the correct position it will snap into place when the mouse button is released.

This computer version of crosswords is a drag and drop process. The child drags the chosen letter from the bottom of the page to the appropriate square. If the sequence of clues are followed the letter will snap into place. In addition a bell will sound signifying this is the first letter going to a colored square. A ting will sound for all other letters. The help button will show the correct answers but the puzzle will clear and restart.

A classic Memory and Match game. Click in squares to reveal a hidden picture. Match the squares and they disappear to reveal a larger banking picture. This puzzle includes a timer and a counter measuring the number of tries.

Budgets is an introduction to Budgeting and Saving. Here the child will learn how to set goals and how to save for them. The child should use this tutorial in conjunction with the Savings Account tutorial. The navigation in this tutorial is different from the rest and directions can be found by clicking on the HELP button.

This tutorial does not address "how much allowance a child should receive".

This is a hands on introduction to Savings Accounts. Progressive screens take the child through the use of a Savings Account; how to make simple deposits and withdrawals; and more complex deposits.

At the end of this series, there is a self marking, multiple choice quiz.

This is the teenager's introduction to a checking account. Through a series of progressive screens, the teen will learn how to make deposits (both checks and cash); deposit checks with cash back; and how to maintain their check register.

At the end of this series, there is a self marking, multiple choice quiz. To find the correct answer click on the help button on the last screen (the score screen).

The Bank Statement Reconciliation is probably the most important portion of the checking account. Here the teen is taught how to properly do a reconciliation.

At the end of this series, there is a self marking, multiple choice quiz. To find the correct answer click on the help button on the last screen (the score screen).

Here the teen will get exposure to an ATM. They will learn how to use an ATM to make withdrawals; check their balance and make deposits. The deposits can only be made at some ATMs. ATM Deposits should only be made at your home bank's ATM.

At the end of this series, there is a self marking, multiple choice quiz. To find the correct answer click on the help button on the last screen (the score screen).

The jigsaw puzzles are drag and drop. They are set up to be progressively more difficult. When the puzzle piece is close to the correct position it will snap into place when the mouse button is released. Some of the pieces have to be rotated to fit properly. This is accomplished by holding down the right arrow on the keyboard and clicking on the piece. The user has the option of showing the piece outline; number; completed image and beveled edges. Clicking on the blue buttons will show or hide these functions.

It is strongly recommended this site be used in conjunction with the US Mint's Childrens Pages. Please address comments or concerns to info@bankingkids.com

© 2003 DGM Graphics, Inc. All rights reserved.